How Agnes Taught Me to Appreciate Difficulty

3 thoughts on “How Agnes Taught Me to Appreciate Difficulty”

  1. This reminds me of my girl Diana, a Priest with a gun and the Knight’s break abilities. I always imagined her as an apprentice Priest-in-training, who’s friendship (or love interest?) with Ramza led her to follow him and discover the lies of her beloved Church, and stuck with him to the bitter end trying to expose said lies. She was even the one who got the final blow on Hashmalum with Holy, showing her disdain for the plots of demons who attempted to use the public. So now whenever I play the game, I always try to roll a generic named Diana, so I can rebuild my favorite girl all over again.

  2. This reminds me of my girl Diana, a Priest with a gun and the Knight’s break abilities. She started off as an apprentice priestess at Ramza’s school, and eventually took the lies of the Church to the face and decided to fight the good fight. She kept the party upright, and even was the one who killed Hashmalum with a blast of Holy. So now every time I play the game, I try to roll a generic named Diana, just so I can rebuild my favorite girl.

  3. This was a great article, and I’m going to bookmark it to remind me of an important element of game design. Reading this reminds me of Yahtzee Croshaw’s complaint about Agnes’ foil, the Natalya Simonovas of the world, who we are asked to care about before the player has had a chance to develop a meaningful relationship with them. The story simply demands that we pretend that we care about them.

    Agnes is the opposite of this. There’s no story-based reason to care about her, and in terms of gameplay, prioritizing her kind of hurts you, but because the player has a relationship with this character we want to field her instead of Orlandu.

    I’ve played FFT many times and had this experience many times and it’s great to have it expressed so clearly.

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